Birch, Himalayan Birch

  • A double row of Betula utilis Jacquemontii on the Barcham Trees nursery

    A double row of Betula utilis Jacquemontii on the Barcham Trees nursery

  • The smooth white juvenile bark of Betula utilis Jacquemontii

    The smooth white juvenile bark of Betula utilis Jacquemontii

  • A mature specimen of Betula utilis Jacquemontii in a parkland setting

    A mature specimen of Betula utilis Jacquemontii in a parkland setting

  • The browny yellow catkins of Betula utilis Jacquemontii

    The browny yellow catkins of Betula utilis Jacquemontii

  • Himalayan Birch exhibiting thier winter glory at Anglesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire

    Himalayan Birch exhibiting thier winter glory at Anglesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire

  • semi mature Betula utilis Jacquemontii to scale

    semi mature Betula utilis Jacquemontii to scale

  • Betula utilis Jacquemontii multi-stem at Barcham Trees

    Betula utilis Jacquemontii as a multi-stem

Betula utilis Jacquemontii

A double row of Betula utilis Jacquemontii on the Barcham Trees nursery

A double row of Betula utilis Jacquemontii on the Barcham Trees nursery

Betula utilis Jacquemontii

There are now so many differing clones put under this banner that the trade is tying itself in knots of confusion but suffice it to say if you are after the gleaming white barked birch under the above cultivar name from Barcham you will not be disappointed.

The unsurpassed whiteness of the trunk and branches peels routinely each year and is accentuated by lenticels lines.

A native of the western Himalayas it makes a medium tree with ascending branches and is also spectacular when grown as a multi-stem.

However beware those growers who palm off a multi stem as three separate trees grown together as this will only lead to structural problems later on.

Its oval dark green leaves turn golden yellow in autumn.

Excellent for urban plantings it grows well on most soils.

Some nurseries have tried growing this clone through micro propagation but the results at maturity are more than disappointing with a loose and poor crown formation.

We strongly recommend a budded / grafted plant as the result is proven and the mature crown structure assured.

We stock these as both single and multi-stemmed.

This tree can be very effectively placed against a dark background in a garden as the white stems bounce back to you in contrast. I normally advocate a planting distance of a minimum of seven metres for any of our trees but have conceded in recent years that this clone is sensational when planted en mas at three to five metre centres. Anglesey Abbey in Cambridgeshire proves this point and a trip to this lovely National Trust garden is a must in winter.

Mature heights and crown spread can vary depending on environmental conditions

Mature height: 15-20m

Mature spread: 4-8m